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Dorothee

Dorothee
Germany

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| 12:55 PM Nov 03 2019

Dorothee

Germany

‘This is How Our Clothes Destroy the Environment’ was a documentary movie that aired last week on the TV-channel ‘WDR’: They say that fishermen from all of Bangladesh currently face a very uncertain future. The number of edible fish they catch has been declining for about ten years now due to water-pollution caused by dyeing works. The thing is that often these factories have their own miniature sewage plant, but they just don’t use it as dyeing without having the sewage plant run is much more profitable for them than having the sewage plant run and having to pay for all the water and electricity.
Of course dealing with these dyeing chemicals without proper protective clothing isn’t good for the workers from these factories either. Nor is this procedure good for people who eat things that have been watered with contaminated water. But still brands in the EU or in the USA can claim that their clothes were produced under environmentally-friendly conditions and even prove this by showing a certificate, just because the Bangladeshi companies they hire own a sewage plant – which they never use, but still…
There even are cases of European enterprises hiring a certified company in Bangladesh which then hired a not certified and thus cheaper company in Bangladesh to dye said clothes. Thus despite what the European enterprise told its customers these clothes ended up being produced under not so environmentally-friendly conditions.

| 12:54 PM Nov 03 2019

Dorothee

Germany

‘This is How Our Clothes Destroy the Environment’ was a documentary movie that aired last week on the TV-channel ‘WDR’: They say that fishermen from all of Bangladesh currently face a very uncertain future. The number of edible fish they catch has been declining for about ten years now due to water-pollution caused by dyeing works. The thing is that often these factories have their own miniature sewage plant, but they just don’t use it as dyeing without having the sewage plant run is much more profitable for them than having the sewage plant run and having to pay for all the water and electricity.
Of course dealing with these dyeing chemicals without proper protective clothing isn’t good for the workers from these factories either. Nor is this procedure good for people who eat things that have been watered with contaminated water. But still brands in the EU or in the USA can claim that their clothes were produced under environmentally-friendly conditions and even prove this by showing a certificate, just because the Bangladeshi companies they hire own a sewage plant – which they never use, but still…
There even are cases of European enterprises hiring a certified company in Bangladesh which then hired a not certified and thus cheaper company in Bangladesh to dye said clothes. Thus despite what the European enterprise told its customers these clothes ended up being produced under not so environmentally-friendly conditions.

| 01:16 PM Sep 15 2019

Dorothee

Germany

‘Domradio’ now reported about a young Bangladeshi girl of only 13 years. She – along with her family – has been living in the Bhola Bosti Slum in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka since erosion and the rise of the sea level destroyed her home on the Bangladeshi island of Bhola. Of course those people don’t have an insurance, so they lost everything. This is not a fictional story. ‘Unicef’ really knows a girl of 13 years who along with her parents and siblings has been through this ordeal. However there are thousands of more former citizens of Bhola who share her story.
P.S. ‘Restlessbeings’ still is a trustworthy aid-organization and so is their website the link of which I posted in one of my first comments under this photo.

| 02:23 PM Sep 14 2019

Dorothee

Germany

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| 05:20 AM Sep 14 2019

Dorothee

Germany

‘Domradio’ now reported about a young Bangladeshi girl of only 13 years. She – along with her family – has been living in the Bhola Bosti Slum in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka since erosion and the rise of the sea level destroyed her home on the Bangladeshi island of Bhola. Of course those people don’t have an insurance, so they lost everything. This is not a fictional story. ‘Unicef’ really knows a girl of 13 years who along with her parents and siblings has been through this ordeal. However there are thousands of more former citizens of Bhola who share her story.
P.S. ‘Restlessbeings’ still is a trustworthy aid-organization and so is their website the link of which I posted in one of my first comments under this photo.