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Dorothee

Dorothee
Germany

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| 02:21 PM Sep 22 2015

Dorothee

Germany

Most German newspapers when talking about the persecution of “witches” in South Africa depict the police as either helpless while facing all these crimes against alleged witches and wizards or as corrupt people who can easily be bribed into ignoring the murder of someone who was accused of being a witch. Also many German newspapers blame this situation on Christianity. I mean, it’s okay to say it out loud if you interpret things this way, but when I saw the English newspaper “African Times” in a kiosk on Tuesday I just wanted to know what someone who grew up in another country may think about this issue…and in fact this journalist saw things a bit differently:
>He argues that these murders don’t happen due to Christianity, but in spite of Christian faith. Colonialists used brute force to make African natives believe in Christianity. This resulted in natives forcefully abandoning some of the things they used to believe in while sticking to other ancient things they couldn’t just stop believing in – like their ideas about spirits, shape shifting and witchcraft. Besides the Old Testament /the Torah says that witches shall be killed, while in many cases the one accused of witchcraft wasn’t killed directly, but cast out of the village which resulted in him or her dying as a homeless on the street.
>People who deep inside the heart may know better, forcefully keep up this belief in witchcraft and evil magic people. For example the police of South Africa already had cases that seemed to be staged by people who just wanted the one they now accused of witchcraft dead.
>A suspiciously high number of victims was either wealthy or came from a family that for different reasons one could easily be jealous of which brings up the question if some of these “witches” just fell victim to a plot caused by either jealous people or by people who hoped that after the execution they could inherit some wealth from those they just sentenced to death.
>Especially in urban areas of South Africa people can be easily confused. That’s why newspapers that may have a provocative and exciting headline like “Witch Stoned To Death”, may be understood by us, but may lead to misinterpretation by people who read this in an urban area in South Africa. Some – but not all – may not be able to understand this stylistic device and take this as another reason to believe in this nonsense. Thus you may also blame newspapers for not taking into account what their readers are able to understand.
>The village of Helena, Limpopo (South Africa) proves that in fact there are officials who put great effort into saving people who otherwise would be sentenced to death for witchcraft. This village was built to have some place to bring alleged witches and wizards to and the idea worked. Nobody – not even those who want every habitant of this village dead – would dare to attack a village full of thought-to-be witches.
>South Africa has a law that makes it illegal to accuse somebody of witchcraft.
As I don’t have a photo that deals with South Africa I just decided to put this message either under my photo of Congo, Angola, Benin, Tanzania, Togo, Malawi, East Timor or the Central African Republic as these countries all have one thing in common: recent cases of people who were accused of witchcraft.
Inspired by this article I did some research on my own only to find out that:
>Save The Children UK (www.savethechildren.org.uk)
and
>UNICEF (www.unicef.org)
actually have their own programs to help children and adolescents accused of witchcraft in countries like these. They just rely on more donors and volunteers which is why I mentioned these two websites now where you may inform yourself about ways to get involved.

| 09:15 AM Aug 14 2015

Dorothee

Germany

Yep! As it seems somebody pushed the “report”-button until they finally removed my photo! Grrr! Still mad at this person! I originally uploaded this pic in 2010 and back then we had such a remarkable member here on englishbaby.com who really cared about and was desturbed by seeing photos of people as young as this one going through so much misery. We had such an interesting discussion about the cause of Togo’s poorness, about how we can help and also about how much each individual can do. And now the original comments are all lost and all I can do is sum it up: He remarked how good it was to see that Togo had become at least a little bit wealthier since the second half of the previous decade started. Also he thinks – or rather thought back then – that most people wouldn’t get poor by donating 100€ per year to countries like Togo, while in reality many don’t even donate 10€ per year. He even was competent enough to have a talk about current subjects with him – like the electoral reforms of 2012.
Oh well! Spilled milk! After I realized that one of my 150 photos was missing it wasn’t really that hard to find out which one and luckily I remembered immediately were my photo was saved. So! No harm done! My anger just flew away!

| 03:28 AM Aug 14 2015

Dorothee

Germany

Associations that help street children from this LDC are:
>UNICEF (www.unicef.org)
>Aid For Africa (www.aidforafrica.org)
>UNHCR (www.unhcr.org)

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