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Life Talk!

Domestic violence against women in the West!!

osesame

osesame

Egypt

We must notice that such violence, which goes beyond human limits and dimensions, is not exercised by illiterate people who live in the countryside somewhere, nor in the poorest areas. Conversely, such abuse is practiced by slick men like those who appear in Hollywood who are in some cases well educated having high social status. It is exercised against weak women, regardless how fine they may appear to be … after returning to their homes; they become nothing more than slaves under the effect of lash of humility and violence.



We will limit our talk to domestic violence against women in the west, and we will prove by numbers that the humiliated woman is not the one who lives in Afghanistan and wears her face cover. We will illustrate that such woman is not the one from the Arabian Peninsula, who is in fact well protected and honored in a community that calls for her respect. Real degrade and vulgarity is that which makes a woman cheap merchandise just like any other tradable good, and made her subject to attacks and all types of oppression and inequity.

01:36 PM Aug 27 2008 |

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kikam

kikam

Algeria

well, as far as i'm concerned, i think that violence against women is a tough issue which exists in alover the world.

but as a girl belonging to an "underdeveloped country" i want to add something( especially for you progression): even some countries, like algeria, are still underdeveloped but believe me things are changing here. women are more and more aware about their rights.

 before, they didn't even know the articles of their constitution ( based on the instructions of quran of course) but now everything is changing, me for example: i graduated from university, i work, my collegues are in majority men, i wear hijab and i'm very proud of it cause this was my choice( cause in my family there are not a lot of girls who wear it), i'm ready and happy to respect and do my level best to satisfy my husband ( as allah orders us) but i never forget that i was born free and i'll die free and i'm ready to protect my ideas, my philosophy of life, my dreams and believe me, i'm strong enough to struggle and keep them all.. i'm just a sample.

 what i want to say is that we( women) don't feel opressed  here at all (there may be some exepssion of course), and the new generation here is ready to make a change, but a good change.. i hope it for all the "underdeveloped countries, muslim or not" cause we all have the right to progress and prosperity.

and since we all have brains we all can make changes without ignoring our identities i hope..

sugar,

i really respect your way of thinking, i mean once we can accept the others as they are we can say that we are developed enough, this is why i don't feel i'm "underdeveloped"Wink

01:07 PM Sep 13 2008 |

kikam

kikam

Algeria

ALGIERS: In this tradition-bound nation scarred by a brutal Islamist-led civil war that killed more than 100,000, a quiet revolution is under way: women are emerging as an economic and political force unheard of in the rest of the Arab world.

Women make up 70 percent of Algeria's lawyers and 60 percent of its judges. Women dominate medicine. Increasingly, women contribute more to household income than men. Sixty percent of university students are women, university researchers say.

In a region where women have a decidedly low public profile, Algerian women are visible everywhere. They are starting to drive buses and taxicabs. They pump gas and wait on tables.

Although men still hold all of the formal levers of power and women still make up only 20 percent of the work force, that is more than twice their share a generation ago, and they seem to be taking over the machinery of state as well.

"If such a trend continues," said Daho Djerbal, editor and publisher of Naqd, a magazine of social criticism and analysis, "we will see a new phenomenon where our public administration will also be controlled by women."

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11:42 AM Sep 14 2008 |

andilee

andilee

United Kingdom

Women are great, why would you want to beat them?

Andi

12:07 PM Jan 17 2009 |

osesame

osesame

Egypt

good effort Sriking force….....

03:11 PM Jan 19 2009 |

spontan

spontan

Germany

good arab men and bad western men,what a low level diskussion!

 

http://www.netzeitung.de/politik/ausland/1316078.htmlhttp://www.netzeitung.de/politik/ausland/1316078.html

Discrimination against women:  Afghanistan regulates the frequency of sex by law   02. Apr 17:45   Enver respecting woman: Afghan President Hamid Karzai  Enver respecting woman: Afghan President Hamid Karzai   Without parliamentary debate in Afghanistan is a discriminatory law to regulate the conjugal duties in force. A UN organization criticized the legalization of rape. The Afghan President Hamid Karzai has on Thursday signed a bill to the wives are forced, at least every four days with her husband to sleep. As long as the husband is not traveling, he has every fourth night, the right to sexual intercourse with his wife, Article 132 of the new law to regulate family life among the Shiites in Afghanistan. These represent about 20 percent of the population.Unless the woman is sick or has some disease, for aggravated sexual intercourse, the woman committed the sexual needs of her husband, a positive answer to give, it says in the law. Not more than four months abstinent  The woman is also a right to sexual satisfaction is warranted, however, since very different timelines mentioned: The man should not exceed four months at a live abstinent. The Karzai without parliamentary debate in force law in Kabul encounters sharp criticism. This would undermine womens rights, after the overthrow of the Islamic Taliban regime in 2001 have been painstakingly achieved, said the opposition MPs Fausia Kufi.  The UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) accused the government before,the rape of a woman by her husband to legalize. The law meant frequent violation of human rights. A spokesman for Karzai said the president have the allegations heard and looks at the thing.

11:51 AM Apr 03 2009 |

fabs1

fabs1

United Kingdom

there's a clear difference between domestic violence in the West, and in the Muslim world.

One gets reported and is punishable by law.

The other doesn't.

 

The lack of statistics and inherent structural problems conerning domestic violence are interpreted by fools like you as being proof that is doesn't exist in Muslim countries.

 

An example:

 

"A study published in June 2006 in the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association, based on interviews with 300 women admitted to hospital for childbirth, said 80 percent reported being subjected to some kind of abuse within marriage.

At times, the violence inflicted on women takes on truly horrendous forms. The Islamabad-based Progressive Women's Association (PWA), headed by Shahnaz Bukhari, believes up to 4,000 women are burnt each year, almost always by husbands or in-laws, often as “punishment” for minor “offences” or for failure to bring in a sufficient dowry.

The PWA said it had collected details of nearly 8,000 such victims from March 1994 to March 2007, from three hospitals in the Rawalpindi-Islamabad area alone."

source: http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=77226

 

This is another ridiculous post by the same fool that has nothing better to do than claim that his religion and way of life is better than everyone else's, especially given overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

06:07 PM Apr 21 2009 |

fabs1

fabs1

United Kingdom

From wikipedia:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_and_domestic_violence

 

Domestic violence is considered by many to be a problem in Muslim-majority cultures.[23]

The incidence in many Muslim-majority countries (where women hide their bruises and little is ever reported to authorities) is uncertain, but believed to be great by Muslim feminists. In some Muslim countries, such as Saudi Arabia,[26] reports indicate that domestic violence is quite widespread. One recent study, in Syria, found that 25% of the married women surveyed said that they had been beaten by their husbands.[27] One study found that half of Palestinian women have been the victims of domestic violence.[28] A WHO study in Babol found that within the previous year 15.0% of wives had been physically abused, 42.4% had been sexually abused and 81.5% had been psychologically abused (to various degrees) by their husbands, blaming low income, young age, unemployment and low education.[29] A 1987 study conducted by the Women's Division and another study by the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan in 1996 suggested that domestic violence takes place in approximately 80 percent of the households in the country.[30][31][32] In Pakistan, domestic violence occurs in forms of beatings, sexual violence or torture, mutilation, acid attacks and burning the victim alive.[33]

According to the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences in 2002, over 90% of married women surveyed in that country reported being kicked, slapped, beaten or sexually abused when husbands were dissatisfied by their cooking or cleaning, or when the women had ‘failed’ to bear a child or had given birth to a girl instead of a boy.[34]

The prevalence of domestic violence has been cited as a cause of high rates of suicide, mostly through self-immolation, among Kurdish women in Iran

06:09 PM Apr 21 2009 |

fabs1

fabs1

United Kingdom

Egypt:

 

Domestic Violence Statistics of Egypt

    * 33% of married women report having been beaten at least once in their marriage (1995)


    * 72% of surveyed women who experienced violence reported being beaten by their husbands, 43% by their fathers, and 37% by their brothers (1995)


    * 80% of rural women in Egypt report beatings are common and often justified (1995)


    * 96% of 444 women interviewed in Manshiet Nasser where ADEW works reported some kind of physical or sexual violence (2001)

06:11 PM Apr 21 2009 |

fabs1

fabs1

United Kingdom

Syria:

 

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0425/p04s01-wome.html

 

Study reveals domestic abuse is widespread in Syria
The first study of its kind in the country shows 25 percent of women may be victims of violence.
This country's only shelter for abused women is largely a secret. Victims learn about it through local churches, aid agencies, or lawyers. It has just 10 beds for the 22 people who were recently staying there.

But a new study released earlier this month that says as many as 1 in 4 Syrian women may be victims of physical violence is beginning to reveal just how widespread a problem domestic abuse is throughout the country. 

06:13 PM Apr 21 2009 |

fabs1

fabs1

United Kingdom

Jordan:

 http://www.measuredhs.com/pr1/post.cfm?id=F4AFA9E4-1143-E773-EB91F730C770F4CF

First ever domestic violence data available in Jordan 

One in five married women report that they have ever experienced physical violence by their husband reports the 2007 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey. Twelve percent of these women experienced spousal physical violence within the past year. The 2007 JPFHS provides the first nationally representative data on domestic violence in the country. Only a small proportion of abused women seek help from medical personnel, police, or lawyers.

 

06:14 PM Apr 21 2009 |