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Pronunciation

britdam007

britdam007

India

Dear Teacher Amy,


   I have gone through a tutorial on word connections and liaison on the internet and I found it  interesting and helpful indeed. I have a question for you regarding the same. Say the compound noun “Social-worker”. The final sound of the word “Social” [L] and the initial sound of the word “worker” [W] – can they be contracted or reduced by any chance? Also regarding the word pair “Third-world” – the final sound of the word “third” is [d] and the initial sound of the word “world” is [w], but while pronouncing there does exist a friction between the final and the initial sound. I’d like to know how to smoothen the friction that exists while pronouncinf the above-mentioned word pairs?



Best regards,


Abhishek



07:06 AM Oct 07 2014 |

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Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

The word “social worker” is run together, without any breath between the two words. It’s still easily understood as two words - social + worker - but one doesn’t typically breathe between them.


As for “third world,” listening to myself pronounce it, it sounds more like “thir” + “dworld.” Again, the words are run together, but in this case the final “d” consonant in “third” is spoken on the front of “world.”


Best,


Amy

03:39 AM Oct 10 2014 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Thank you for your explanation. So does the same rule apply whenever the initial sound and the final sound of a word-pair are consonant souds? e.g. cold-war? and what if it’s not a word pair? e.g bad manners, cool shirt, disc-shaped etc.



Best regards,


Abhishek

06:44 AM Oct 10 2014 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

you have mentioned that in case of the word pair “social worker”- the 2 consonants sounds are run together, without any breath between the 2 words. So does that necessarily mean that I should not fully pronounce the final consonant sound of the word “social” and run into the next word immiditely which is “worker”in this case? Please help me understand?


Also I have 2 more word pairs for you:


1) The word portable is used to describe something movable.


How would you contract the 2 consonant sounds of the words highlighted in bold?


2) Some workers of the factory fell ill.


How would you contract the 2 consonant sounds of the words highlighted in bold?


Best regards,



Abhishek



08:39 AM Oct 10 2014 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

There is no set rules about pronunciation of what you call “word pairs,” unfortunately. It depends on the individual, as well as how fast a person is speaking. In terms of the words “social” and “worker,” for example, while they are run together without a breath between them, you’ll notice that you’re still pronouncing the final “l” and beginning “w.” You’re simply not pausing between the words for more than a second.


Can you say more about “contracting” consonant sounds? This is not a term I have heard of.


Best,


Amy

07:16 PM Oct 12 2014 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

Correction: There are no set rules about pronunciation…

07:17 PM Oct 12 2014 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Thank you ma’am.  One last query- “The world is not enough” in this sentence how to merge the 2 words “the” and “world” together?



Best regards,


Abhishek

06:41 AM Oct 13 2014 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Contracting consonant sounds: e.g.   I want you.  In this sentence the final sound if the word “want” is [t] and the initial sound of the word you [y]. When these sounds are combined we get a completely new different sound [ch] which is also a consonant sound. So finally the sentence “I want you” should sound like “I wan chew” . In English phonetics this is called Liaison if I’mnot wrong. Are you with me? I would request you to go thro’ the link that I’m pasting herewith.


http://202.121.48.120/Download/021f9c33-9729-46db-a440-0446bf6eab14.pdf



Best regards,


Abhishek

07:06 AM Oct 13 2014 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

Thanks for the link! It was very interesting.


To answer you last query, in the sentence “The world is not enough,” there is no liaison between the two words “the” and “world.” Both words are pronounced in full. 


Best,


Amy

02:58 AM Oct 16 2014 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Should there be a 1 second pause between “the” and “world” or “the” is immiditely run into “world”?


Best regards,


Abhishek

04:34 PM Oct 16 2014 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

“The” and “world” are spoken immediately after one another. 


Best,


Amy

02:53 AM Oct 17 2014 |